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to encouraging stewardship of the environment, land conservation, watershed protection and eliminating harmful chemicals. additional funding provided by: the colcom foundation. the wallace genetic foundation and by the charles a. frueauff foundation. >> this week on "to the contrary" first, is affirmative action still necessary? then, latina voter turnout and behind the headlines: women who lead drug cartels. hello, i'm bonnie erbe. welcome to to the contrary, a discussion of news and social trends from diverse perspectives. up first, the supreme court and affirmative action. next week justices will hear arguments in an affirmative action case that could change admissions policies at public colleges and universities. it marks the first time the supreme court will address the topic in nearly a decade. fisher v. university of texas at austin involves a white student, abigail fisher, who was denied admission in 2008. it challenges the constitutionality of using race as a factor in admissions decisions. fisher argues the university's race-conscious policy violated her civil and constitutional righ
environment, you will find this layer of chert. it's in all colors, purple, green, red, blue. it's a beautiful rock. . >> one thing i wanted to ask you, the review in the paper recently on sunday said that your book is different from all the other books about the anastazi because you brought out some of the non-flattering parts of their culture like violence. how did you conclude that they were a violent culture? . >> well, i didn't necessarily conclude they were a violent culture, i just concluded there was violence in their culture. the evidence is very clear where you find masker sites, where every place you drop a trench there are bodies, unburied bodies missing their heads, in some cases where there will be a head in one room and you can match it up to the body which is in another room 100 yards away and they didn't just end up there; somebody took the head off. and there will be places where it's all femurs, all gathered together. and places where it's obviously some kind of warfare event where people are all huddled into one spot and they have all been burned there. the record is very c
of the environment. think about the amount of paper when redrafted the accord. but today we speak of the leadership. for example, according to the oslo accord is available with everyone to pray but it is not safe. we cannot go there. it is not safe. i do not believe in another ceremony at the white house but to and until we get to the point* you have to manage the conflict i want to sum up to tell you the book is very street. they said you are making a mistake if you raise something in a book now what will happen in a few years? people will say 182 about that and what you doing? if somebody wants to lead i can protect and if they cannot i will say was wrong but we will see the public and majority of the american people understand it is not what israel is willing to pay but want to thank you for coming tonight and will be happy if you cave ready to answer the question will be happy to answer your question. thank you very much. [applause] >> don't you think the talk you give tonight encourages the extremist of the muslim world to join israel? there is a struggle between the moderates and the extremis
to stimulate cargo. the cargo has to be there from the manufacturers and from the general economic environment. but next year, the car go industry might pick up a little bit. the conditions for cargo are still very bad now. but again, overall the industry of course is still more passenger than cargo. and it's been a bit of a double whammy this year because for the long call carriers operating out of asia, they're heavily exposed to markets like europe where there's been an impact. >> are we going get anymore meaningful consolidation? i don't see eus saying to america you should really allow for proper mergers between european and u.s. airlines. do you think that's ever going it to be allowed? >> there's still a lot of steps to be taken to allow that to happen. true global consolidation, a lot of countries still have policies that limit foreign investment in the airline sector. so we need to see a lot of changes in the regulatory environment to allow that to happen. in the meantime, we did see a lot of consolidation continue to happen within regions like latin america, like north america, like
and retail business are rising. and also in some lines of the industrial business. so the overall environment for the insurance industry is very good. your free float is about 20%. will you stop here for a while or will you raise money in the future? >> we'll raise money in the future, however, not for the next 24 months. we are sufficiently capitalized now after this ipo on for the next 24 months, but there will be further capital increases in the future. this is just our first step in to becoming a listed insurance company. >> all right. and just give us your view where we stand at the moment with the world economy. because it's interesting where you're looking at your operations. eurozone still in the grips of recession or low growth, weaker growth in asia. just give us your sense of how you view the world and how it transfers back into your business. >> i'm 100% sure that the euro will survive. the euro is instrumental for the future of europe. the emerging market particularly in brazil and mexico are very interesting growing markets for the future. and also the middle and eastern europea
/3 of the country saying we're on the wrong track, usually that's a very difficult environment for the incumbent to get elected. and for the president, voters are not convinced they wanted to go the romney's direction, but extending where we are for the next four years is not an attractive process. he's got to walk that tight rope by saying we are moving in the right direction. and also kind of give people a sense of the next four years that are going to be better in their arrives than the previous four have been. >> sometimes we look ahead and see that yes, what these candidates say is going to be important and pivotal what their body language has said. who can forget the gore-bush debate, and you have to wonder betwn these two candidates, romney and obama, who's likely to win, who's likely to be too breathy, or maybe be an easy read just by finally expressions that could potentially hurt their performance? >> first of all, debates have -- there's no subsequent record of whether debates have been significant or not. certainly in 1980, to some extent in 1992. if you have looked at the debates fr
stress. having firearms injected into that environment is not healthy. there is also a lot of dissenting views on campus. all political spectrum represented on campus for some their opinions on many different issues. having firearms present in those kinds of discussions is also, i think, potentially volatile. >> your own personal concerns about, for example, grading students? >> i connect with my students on i a pretty deep level, i think, not only in lecture, but also when i pass on their grading exams. sometimes, a failing grade that i may have to issue as part of my duty as a professor could be the final failing grade that pushes them out of the diversity. that has a potentially big impact on their life, and that is a potential for some rational behavior. after all, they are human beings. i would not a fought -- want a firearm in my own pocket throughout my daily experiences, and i do not believe human being should be trusted to behave appropriately with a firearm circumstances. >> last i was giving a talk at the university church in boulder. a woman had come up to me and said, are yo
and reinvent the rule naps is because we are in a very different work environment technology is making older jobs outdate faster and spin off new jobs. and they each one requires more education. and i just think if we're going it i think america is a huge advantage in the world. because the i think the world is going to be divided going forward between high imagination and enabling countries and low imagination enabling country. rethe highest imagination enabling country in the world. if you have spark of an idea you can go to delta in taiwan they'll design it. they'll get you a cheap chinese manufacture. amazon will gift wrap it for christmas. free lancer get the logo. they are commodities except this. that's no country that does better. the problem with this though, the days will ford will move to your job with 25,000 person factory is over. it's 2500 people and a lot of robots and you know the old joke, the modern factory of the future is two employees, a man and the dog. the man is there to feed the dog and the dog there to keep the man away from the machines. generating 12 million nor j
attention from getting with its own internal problems to try to confront a more hostile external environment. so continuing to engage, having confining areas of cooperation in areas of energy, the development, for instance, mess nuclear simple energy program under way. we are already cooperate with the chinese. find these areas, keep our markets open, but don't create a more hostile external environment that is absolutely essential. very important we keep the balance. there's a fine line between balance and provocation to we want to stay well on the side of balance of constructive environment spent dr. kissinger, i was surprised to hear you say that the comments made by both candidates used the term extreme deplorable leverage about china. i know you endorsed mitt romney. have you had that conversation with him? have you said i find your conversation really deplorable? ass. >> i see the advertisements of the two candidates every day are competing with each other on how to deal with the cheating things with china, and both of you cheat as applied to china. >> and trade. >> and trade. and it m
procurement called next generation desktop environment. so, agencies are moving in that direction, and we're seeing more and more of those come in. mostly cross-domain is a component of a bigger procurement, not a procurement on itself. >> on itself. and so you would then team with other firms and there's a lot of teaming going on around all that cross-domain. yes. and so people looking to enter this segment of the marketplace, what should they focus on? i mean, obviously, their competency. what else? >> you know, i would say partner with someone who's in the space already. we're not the only ones, of course. there are others. because it's a tough-- it's a tough area to get into if you're not experienced in it. >> ok. yes. and when you mention security clearance, is it a highly secured space? >> yes, it is. most of the solutions are installed in scifs or other secure facilities. >> mm-hmm. so, if you haven't been in this, it's not something that you can, as an ingenue, start up. >> right. it's a difficult startup. yeah. >> and you need to have those clearances. what about the depth that r
many signs. the austrian accord, big supporters of the environment. think about the amount of paper that was wasted when we drafted the oslo accord. thousands of papers. but today we come and we speak with the palestinian leadership about the oslo accord, well, it is written, so what? for example, [inaudible] a holy site for jews in an in accordance to the oslo accord were supposed to go there whenever we want pray, that we cannot go there. it's not safe for jews, cannot go to date and pray at the tomb of jordan. so it is written in the oslo accords. i don't want to another accord and another ceremony at the white house. i don't believe in it. i want to get to the point where there will be real peace with real partner, and still we'll get to that point we will have to manage the conflict. i want to sum up and tell you that the book is very straight. i didn't hide, and some of my colleagues in the parliament told me, you're making a mistake because if you buy something out in the book and you are young relatively, what will happen in two years? people will go back and tell you, your
mean investing in education, health care, the environment, and middle-class tax cuts and retirement security. that is my agenda and that is why i think that it's not just a question of experience. >> governor bush, one minute rebuttal. >> well, we do come from different places. i come from west texas. the governor is the chief executive officer. we know how to set agendas. i think you'll find the difference reflected in our budgets. i want to take one-half of the surplus and dedicate it to social security. one-quarter of the surplus for important projects, and i want to send one-quarter of the surplus back to the people who pay the bills. i want everybody who pays taxes to have their tax rates cut. and that stands in contrast to my worthy opponent's plan, which will increase the size of government dramatically. his plan is three times larger than president clinton's proposed plan eight years ago. it is a plan that will have 200 new programs -- expanded programs and creates 20,000 new bureaucrats. it it empowers washington. tonight you're going to hear that my passion and my vision i
the ability to cause us taxpayers to have to pay them for the right to protect our environment and our water supply and our climate and human rights and wages and things like that. so this is absolutely outrageous. if we could go back to a system of one person, one vote, and have a real free press that enabled us to communicate and inform each other this would be a wonderful idea. unfortunately we're not there right now, so political parties in my view allow us to work together around the shared agenda. and the green party is really the one political party that is not funded by corporate money, by money that's coming from special interests. so in my way it's a way -- view it's a way for us to work together on our lives, future, education, our health and environment. host: according to the latest fcc records you received a recent installment of about $160,000, part of the matching funds still in place for those candidates who agree to accept matching funds. is that a enough money to spread the green party message? guest: we have a different way of approaching this. the big parties use tv adve
, no strict time limits for answers. creating an environment in which the two will be able to challenge one another. every detail here set for tonight, both campaigns flipping a coin. the president will be introduced first, he'll get the first question. the romney campaign winning the toss on closing arguments. governor romney will get the final word tonight. even a coin toss over the wives. mrs. romney will be introduced first. both wives playing the role of debate partner. mrs. romney telling cnn it's been her most important role during the campaign. >> it's a cute thing that he does, almost after every answer. he finds me in the audience. as soon as he gets on stage, the first thing he does is, he takes off his watch and puts it on the podium. but then he writes "dad." >> reporter: romney's father, the one-time michigan governor, who also ran for president. and the first lady acknowledging her own nerves. >> i get so nervous at these debates and, you know, i'm like one of those parents watching their kid on the balance beam. you just are standing there, trying not to, you know, have any
not think we should make a -- divert attention to try to confront it in an external environment. continuing to engage, having areas of cooperation in energy, the development of a massive nuclear civil energy programs. we are already cooperating with the chinese. keep our markets open. but do not create a more hostile environment that is essential. is is important we keep a balance in the region. there is a line between balancing provocation and we want to stay on the side of balance and a constructive environment. >> i was surprised to hear you say that the comments made by both candidates, you used the term deplorable. i know you have endorsed mitt romney. have you had that conversation with him? abbey said i find your comments deplorable? -- have you said i find your comments deplorable? [laughter] >> i see these advertisements for the candidates are debating with each other on how to deal with the cheating of china. both used the word cheat. it may be that in china they do not understand and i am bothered by the fact that appealing to china -- it does not affect my feeling of the canada.
. it details next. at the end of the day it's all about the environment. wait. no it's not. melissa: all right. so, when you are out shopping do you look for green products? you want to pay more? billing green is big business, but the federal trade commission is cracking down on how companies market their goods. consumers like you and i don't get duped. the problem is that the green knight seems pretty vague and might end up hurting the business bottom-line. joining me now, expert maurice, president of reiss and greece. thank you for coming on the show to me it kind of makes sense. anybody can say their product is green if it is trendy. it's like organic. you put it on anything and people want to buy it. >> well, yes. but that is assuming consumers are really stupid. they just buy everything. and you know what, consumers are skeptical. and like you said, they are actually less willing to buy things that are green and not willing to spend more money in a lot of cases. the biggest issue is green is on everything. makes it less powerful, and they are extremely skeptical. wind we need all this new
a faster and may be reinvent the rules and that is because we are in a very different work environment where technology is making jobs out a bit faster and spinning off new jobs each of the jobs require education. so i think that if we are going to -- america is a huge advantage in this world because it's -- i think the world is going to be divided going forward between the high imagination and the countries and low imagination and the countries and we have the highest imagination enabling country in the world. if you have the spark of an idea you have a delta to design this for you you skip over to the manufacturer for this and amazon will to the fulfillment and delivery and gift wrap for christmas. craigslist will get you an accountant and your logo. they are all commodities except this and there is no country that does this better. the problem with this though is the days where ford will move to the town's 25,000 person factory are over. the factory is now 2500 people may be a lot of robots. you know the old joke it will be to employees, a man and a dog the man is there to feed the
environment, even 90 minutes with a skilled moderator, allow them to go at each other, steering the debate, that is one thing. but if it is complete free-for- all, i think the campaign would never risk it. >> in the first debate, i learned afterward, nixon was one of the smartest politicians ever to be vice president, and of course later, president. and he was the most gracious. that did not come across in the debate. why was that? no one seems to have asked that question. was he over-awed by his wealth, his tan? that is why what i want to know. why nixon did not bring that out as much as he did in the first one, in the next three. >> if i could, on the fact checking, one thing that i do that is helpful is to go to multiple fact checking organizations. go to several and get the consensus about what people have to say about the candidate's statements. >> we will go to a question from the studio. >> i have a question for professor mcilwain. i have been intrigued by your academic work, looking at how race influences the way candidates communicate with different audiences. for the first time,
. i think that's really the answer to jobs, because in a zero corporate tax rate environment if the private sector doesn't create tens of millions of jobs, i don't know what it's going to take to create tens of millions of jobs. it's the answer when it comes to exports bleeding out all existing federal tax out of all goods and services. it's the answer to china. i see manufacturing jobs flocking back to the united states given a zero corporate tax rate environment. are you hearing these things from these other two guys? no, not even remotely close. they're arguing over who's going to spend more money on medicare. romney says he wants to balance the federal budget, but that he wants to increase spending for the military. well, it doesn't add up. and if we want to believe in the things that these guys are saying, then i guess we belief in the easter bunny and santa claus and by extension the tooth fairy and, steve, i don't think thai coming. >> host: gary johnson is with us, and want to remind viewers we'll a add a fourth line this morning for third-party voters, 202-585-3883 i
that it's an a austere environment and it's not safe. my answer to that is you do what you have to to make sure that it is safe so you can conduct your investigation. you ask your guys on the ground what is needed to secure that area and you do it immediately. to me there is no other acceptable course of action regarding it. martha: what do you think -- the more you learn about the details of that night, and that your two former colleagues were half a mile away in another location, and that this action apparently moved from the consulate where ambassador stevens was to the area half a mile away where they were and they got drawn into this. what does that tell you from your experience? >> from an operative's perspective it absolutely tells me there was a number of individuals utilized in the attack, without question, in my opinion, it was preplanned and it needs to be coordinated at a petty high level. so it's not something that is easy to pull off based on the fact that there was multiple locations, good distances apart, for sure that they had pretty reliable intelligence on what was going
operations are safe and clean for our communities and the environment. we're america's natural gas. i've got a nice long life ahead. big plans. so when i found out medicare doesn't pay all my medical expenses, i looked at my options. then i got a medicare supplement insurance plan. [ male announcer ] if you're eligible for medicare, you may know it only covers about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. call now and find out about an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, it helps pick up some of what medicare doesn't pay. and could save you thousands in out-of-pocket costs. to me, relationships matter. i've been with my doctor for 12 years. now i know i'll be able to stick with him. [ male announcer ] with these types of plans, you'll be able to visit any doctor or hospital that accepts medicare patients. plus, there are no networks, and you never need a referral to see a specialist. so don't wait. call now and request this free decision guide to help you better understand
are you going to pay for the tax cut? how will you create jobs and all of this environment. and still all the things that you want to do. just doesn't add up. that is very point that the president made last night. it doesn't add up. >> what mitt romney said last night when he was governor he worked with a democrat house and senate he will work across party lines to make things happen. just not the president that makes things happen. you have to work together. that is how our forefathers meant it. president obama when he had his democrat house and senate he got everything he wanted and still his policies failed. but mitt romney has been proven to make things happen and make things greater. jon: angela -- >> i'm glad you said that please tell your folk on capitol hill. that is exactly what we need in washington right now. which need both parties working together to move us forward. >> maybe need to help obama with communications so he can do better in the next debate. jon: there is a compliment for you. cory, an gell last, thank you both. >> thank you. jenna: some new details about an al qa
natural gas producers to supply affordable, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. >>> bottom of the hour now. welcome back, everyone. i'm randi kaye. here are a few stories we're watching this morning. new developments in that shooting that killed a u.s. border patrol agent. the fbi now thinks he may have died by friendly fire. 30-year-old nicholas ivie was shot and killed this week in arizona. originally officials said ivie and his colleague, wounded in the incident, came under fire after responding to a sensor that went off, but authorities say the only shell casings found at the scene were those belonging to the agents. >>> ivie is the third border patrol agent killed in the line of duty this year now. >>> an amb
and environment reporting network found more than 100 reported illnesses due to blue-green algae exposure. >> essentially if we don't solve this problem somebody is going to die. >> reporter: ohio state's dr. jeffrey reuter is the foremost authority on blue-green algae and he says it is a nationwide problem caused by farm fertilizer runoff. the cure he says is convincing farmers to carefully fertilize so nutrients stay on the fields and not in the water. >> other wise the blooms are going to continue to grow, the human health problems that we see are going to increase. >> reporter: assaulting our senses, our economy, and our health. jim avila, abc news, wisconsin. >> that is nasty stuff. >> the wisconsin department of natural resources says the best way to treat this is naturally. but, they say that it could take several years to get rid of it come fleetl completely, a large amount of lake erie, third of the surface covered. >> cut big time into the fishing industry there. in more or less every state. peaks august through september. nearly every state in the union. clear rereally bad ther
the president is headed towards creating an environment where he has a significant advantage. >> mitt romney will be so exceptionable tomorrow there will be a seismic shift. >> tune in. talk about next week in class. >> you engage in more localized races, congressional and senate, a bit about how you choose rarities said to have a broader >> that is a big question. we are clearly focused on the presidential election. the goal is to defeat president obama and elect a new president of heavily invested in the senate and house races. we are focused on all of them. the senate races is where you will see more of the advertising earlier on, because the bigger the office, the more people pay attention earlier. we will be engaged in a number of house races probably later on as we get closer. >> that is the other thing, a crossroads places outside role in the senate races. do not think that these are not inclinentwined. even if there was parity, the republican side, a crossroads and others, our way out spending on the senate races in house races. those all have an impact, because it is the environment
place. they set up a set just like it will look like in denver. they are used the environment. they have somebody to play the moderator and ask questions. obama does not like sound bites. they force him to give answers. they do whatever they can to simulate the debate situation. >> you quote a former chief of staff to boast -- to vice- president alkyl and joe -- al gore and joe biden. let me read some of his points. -- can you elaborate? >> sure. he is not really specifically using this advice for romney or obama, although i have no doubt many of these tips are being passed on to president obama. it is interesting. that was my first short summary of what he has to say. he went into more debt -- depth about each one of those things. impressions of the debate are formed very early. in the first half hour. a lot of the reporters will be writing their stories in the first half hour. you need to come out strong. if there is something you want to say, you have to say it right away. you suggest candidates, when they come out to the sage, right down three points they want to make. when you are w
, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. i have a cold... i took dayquil, but i still have a runny nose. [ male announcer ] truth is, dayquil doesn't work on runny noses. what? [ male announcer ] it doesn't have an antihistamine. really? [ male announcer ] really. alka-seltzer plus cold and cough fights your worst cold symptoms, plus has a fast acting antihistamine to relieve your runny nose. [ sighs ] thank you! [ male announcer ] you're welcome. that's the cold truth! [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus. ♪ oh what a relief it is! ♪ [ male announcer ] try new alka-seltzer plus severe allergy to treat allergy symptoms, plus sinus congestion, and pain.
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)

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